B is for buggy running

This article originally appeared in Issue #10 of Like the Wind magazine with an illustration by Lisa Buchanan. It is reproduced here with permission of the team at this beautiful magazine – please do check it out.

Original article in Like The Wind magazine with illustration by Lisa Buchanan

“Can I get in the buggy?”, “That kid’s cheating”, “Who said men can’t multitask?” are a few heckles I’ve had recently.

“He’s going to push me round when he’s older,” is my usual reply, as I try to avoid tripping anyone up with the wheels.

I never planned to become a buggy runner. It was not a conscious decision. It started as a solution to the challenge of fitting in the selfish act of running with the new arrival. But now I enjoy it in its own right.

Before the boy appeared, my weekend routine often started with a parkrun or a longer Saturday morning run. After his arrival, I was determined to keep running but it just did not happen at first.

There was not much exercise of any kind going on – there was far too much else to do (including sleeping).

But four weeks on, one of my very first trips out of the house alone with him was to see friends at parkrun and have a cup of tea afterwards. It was great to get out.

Over the following weeks, I grew in confidence with these trips, volunteering as a marshal a couple of times and then nervously lining up at the back of the running pack.

A couple of nods from the other buggied parents as we gathered, and then we were off. One of the dads shot off at a blistering pace, equipped with a bicycle bell on his buggy to warn of his speedy manoeuvres. Clearly a pro.

I knew the route was flat and on a good track, so I could concentrate more on pushing style, trying not to clip anyone, and not veering into the path of any bikes/dogs/walkers when I hit any twig or rock.

Nearing the finish line at Cardiff parkrun (pic by Luke Heslop)

I have still never really discovered a specific pushing technique – it varies so much depending on the terrain, how I am feeling and how much attention the boy wants – sometimes he wants to hold my hand for a whole mile, which leads to a very ungainly bent-double-stance.

Of course the biggest thing is to make sure the boy is appropriately-clothed, well-fed and generally happy. In those early days, he was sleeping a lot and he might wake up on the walk home, but two years on, he is much more mobile.

When it’s all going well, you get a few smiles or the friendly heckles, which is nice, but if he is screaming, writhing and shouting “No running, Daddy!”, those smiles quickly turn to disapproving stares.

“He likes it really” sounds a bit hollow at those moments, but they usually pass…Usually. I must admit there have been a couple of abandoned or shortened attempts where a combination of factors (usually caused by poor or optimistic planning on my part) has led to disaster.

The worst saw him twisting himself into a wet knot (I blame not-tight-enough shoulder straps mixed with a sudden downpour) within seconds. And then his trousers inexplicably started coming off. I had to cower under a bridge that day. Hashtag fail

Those are the exceptions though. Whether we’re exploring new places, revelling in perfectly flat paths or getting fresh air together, buggy running gives us a lovely sense of sharing a moment.

And that’s what I particularly love now. The joy of being together is our special treat, and our conversations are improving too – he points out lots of animals or trees, so we talk about those, or whether we are going to go over Boing-Boing Bridge (he loves the jolting bounces as we go up and down the shallow steps of an otherwise-very-ordinary bridge near the house).

Marshalling with buggy on the 9th anniversary of Cardiff parkrun (pic by Luke Heslop)

Ending at the playground for him to have a run around it very popular too.

When we are doing parkrun, or any other event involving with more people, I do worry about annoying other runners, either by introducing an unexpected vehicle onto the path or by just overtaking them, but I haven’t experienced any real grumbles.

And I have been on the other side of that too – not long ago, in my pre-buggy days, I was beaten by a buggy in a 10-mile race. I was going as fast as I could but only nearly caught up near the end when the baby threw a toy out and his dad had to circle back to fetch it. It still makes me laugh.

I do hope it is going to encourage my son to be a runner too – I see other parents running with their older kids and would like to think we’ll graduate to that one day, although I do suspect I will miss the buggy days hugely.

I am not just saying it – but he genuinely does seem to enjoy buggy running too – especially if I lean over to tickle him while we are going along.

It’s a killer on the back, but hearing him giggling as he hurtles along is one of the best feelings around.

And I believe buggy running has taught me to be less competitive – another dad recently passed me at a parkrun with two kids in a double buggy and also a dog. Fair play to him…I was happy to let him go!

Although there are limits…At the Barcelona Marathon, I saw a man who seemed to be running round with a buggy – now that is too much…isn’t it?

Things to consider  

  • You have to plan well – not just with snacks and drinks, but also in terms of the route and you have to be prepared to bail out at any time
  • You learn lots about good pavements – some routes need to be avoided!
  • It’s not about the buggy – I don’t have a proper running buggy (even though it’s called Baby Jogger). Some people have three-wheelers but I like my four-wheeler as it’s quite responsive.

Any other buggy runners out there? Please comment with any more tips to pass on too!

Running and fundraising – 10 things I have learnt

If you are doing an event to raise money for charity, you might be facing a fundraising target that feels as daunting as the race itself.

This might be for a Golden Bond place (around £2,000 for a coveted London marathon spot) or because you just want to raise as much money as possible for your cause.

A supermarket bucket collection is so easy that a child can do it.

Either way, it can be a lot to consider when you are also trying to put in the training miles too.

I have found it really motivating to see the training and the fundraising as two halves of the same challenge, with each giving momentum to the other.

When I am running, I try to use the time to think about plans for the next event, or people to contact/ideas to follow up as it is always good to keep thinking of new things.

If it’s your first event, you might get a great wave of support and donations from friends and family, but after that, charity/donation fatigue becomes a very real concern.

GET STARTED

It’s so awkward to just keep asking the same people for money and if you do more events regularly, people quickly realise that this is something you obviously like doing.

So if you can offer something in return for a donation, then it’s easier for everyone.

I am sure there are loads of great fundraising ideas out there (and please add yours in the comments below), but here are 10 thoughts which might help:

  1. Get an online page set up as soon as possible. If someone asks if you are fundraising, it can be really frustrating if you don’t have something to send it straightaway. On the page, you should explain why the cause is important to you too – the more people understand why you are doing it, the more they are likely to support you.
  2. Think about lots of ways you can fundraise. I find that little and often is good. Taking cakes to the office may only raise £20/25 a time, but if you do it a few times over a few months, it adds up and people will occasionally stick a tenner in the box. Also, cakes can be expensive to make, but you can approach local supermarkets to explain what you are doing and speak to the manager, they might be able to give you £20/£30 of ingredients – really handy to get a stock of flour/butter/sugar in.
  3. Sticking with the supermarkets, another great idea is to approach your local stores if you can come along with a fundraising bucket on a Saturday – for a few hours’ work, you can raise loads even if you are on your own (you may need a letter from the charity to do this). Last time I did this, I got one slot in the coming weeks, and another a few months later just before the event and it really helped.
  4. Start early – if you are thinking about doing an event next year, why not start with some smaller events now. Even if you are planning one big event like a gala dinner, it is great to have the ball rolling and the totaliser started to make you feel more positive. And the more friends you involve, the more people who might be able to help in other ways too (such as helping with your big/other events)
  5. For big events, there are ways of making things easier. My current event of choice is a curry/quiz night where you charge £20/25 for a night out at a local restaurant (charging £11 per head) then also doing a quiz at the end of the night. It’s a chance to see friends for a nice evening, you don’t get stressed about food and everyone enjoys competing to win a box of chocolates.
    All you have to do is write some questions, and you can add a raffle or a heads/tails game (everyone gives a £1 coin and keeps guessing heads/tails to try to match your coin until only one is left) to add a bit more too.
  6. Look at things you enjoy and keep it simple. If you bake cakes, organise a bake off competition or a coffee morning. If you play netball or five-a-side football, organise a tournament. I have done a few football tournaments – most centres have a charity event package already costed and you can opt to have referees etc. One quick word about tournaments – it can be hard to get teams to commit so if you can get them to pay a deposit, you can help prevent teams dropping out on the day.
  7. Keep asking for raffle prizes and don’t take it personally if people aren’t able to help. If you are out for a meal, why not ask the manager if they ever do vouchers as prizes – there is no harm in asking and you might get some nice surprises of really generous gifts. And what about unwanted/unused Christmas gifts too? If you are fundraising for a spring marathon, you might already have a good range of prizes suitable for your raffle/quiz night already sitting on your shelves.
  8. If there is a big sporting event at some point during your fundraising, a sweepstake is a quick and easy option too. Get in there early, make clear it’s for charity and charge £5 or £10 to enter. The prize doesn’t have to be much, and I have recently done a couple where I sent regular emails round to participants each time people got knocked out, mentioning each person by name in a poem so that they got a bit more out of it (when I say poem, it was along the lines of “Sweden got sent packing by Spain, so that saw Dave crash out of the game”)
  9. Spread the word. Your local paper might well be interested in your efforts- either in the run itself or your fundraising events. It can help get support, but it’s worth saying that an article, or even a frenzied social media campaign to get lots of retweets from celebrities to a sponsorship page is not always going to bring in money on its own – people will give if they feel a connection. And if you can give people other ways to help like attending an event, that might be more effective than a direct ask for money.
  10. Make a film. A few years ago, I decided I needed something to send out with fundraising links. Turns out it is a really good way to engage with people and led to some great donations and interactions. Here’s the one for Paris/London:

And here’s the one for Barcelona:

What fundraising tips do you have? Please get in touch below.

PS In case you are wondering, my current page is here. You may notice it is not prolific which is because I was worried about my first ultra and was nervous to talk about it beforehand.