B is for buggy running

This article originally appeared in Issue #10 of Like the Wind magazine with an illustration by Lisa Buchanan. It is reproduced here with permission of the team at this beautiful magazine – please do check it out.

Original article in Like The Wind magazine with illustration by Lisa Buchanan

“Can I get in the buggy?”, “That kid’s cheating”, “Who said men can’t multitask?” are a few heckles I’ve had recently.

“He’s going to push me round when he’s older,” is my usual reply, as I try to avoid tripping anyone up with the wheels.

I never planned to become a buggy runner. It was not a conscious decision. It started as a solution to the challenge of fitting in the selfish act of running with the new arrival. But now I enjoy it in its own right.

Before the boy appeared, my weekend routine often started with a parkrun or a longer Saturday morning run. After his arrival, I was determined to keep running but it just did not happen at first.

There was not much exercise of any kind going on – there was far too much else to do (including sleeping).

But four weeks on, one of my very first trips out of the house alone with him was to see friends at parkrun and have a cup of tea afterwards. It was great to get out.

Over the following weeks, I grew in confidence with these trips, volunteering as a marshal a couple of times and then nervously lining up at the back of the running pack.

A couple of nods from the other buggied parents as we gathered, and then we were off. One of the dads shot off at a blistering pace, equipped with a bicycle bell on his buggy to warn of his speedy manoeuvres. Clearly a pro.

I knew the route was flat and on a good track, so I could concentrate more on pushing style, trying not to clip anyone, and not veering into the path of any bikes/dogs/walkers when I hit any twig or rock.

Nearing the finish line at Cardiff parkrun (pic by Luke Heslop)

I have still never really discovered a specific pushing technique – it varies so much depending on the terrain, how I am feeling and how much attention the boy wants – sometimes he wants to hold my hand for a whole mile, which leads to a very ungainly bent-double-stance.

Of course the biggest thing is to make sure the boy is appropriately-clothed, well-fed and generally happy. In those early days, he was sleeping a lot and he might wake up on the walk home, but two years on, he is much more mobile.

When it’s all going well, you get a few smiles or the friendly heckles, which is nice, but if he is screaming, writhing and shouting “No running, Daddy!”, those smiles quickly turn to disapproving stares.

“He likes it really” sounds a bit hollow at those moments, but they usually pass…Usually. I must admit there have been a couple of abandoned or shortened attempts where a combination of factors (usually caused by poor or optimistic planning on my part) has led to disaster.

The worst saw him twisting himself into a wet knot (I blame not-tight-enough shoulder straps mixed with a sudden downpour) within seconds. And then his trousers inexplicably started coming off. I had to cower under a bridge that day. Hashtag fail

Those are the exceptions though. Whether we’re exploring new places, revelling in perfectly flat paths or getting fresh air together, buggy running gives us a lovely sense of sharing a moment.

And that’s what I particularly love now. The joy of being together is our special treat, and our conversations are improving too – he points out lots of animals or trees, so we talk about those, or whether we are going to go over Boing-Boing Bridge (he loves the jolting bounces as we go up and down the shallow steps of an otherwise-very-ordinary bridge near the house).

Marshalling with buggy on the 9th anniversary of Cardiff parkrun (pic by Luke Heslop)

Ending at the playground for him to have a run around it very popular too.

When we are doing parkrun, or any other event involving with more people, I do worry about annoying other runners, either by introducing an unexpected vehicle onto the path or by just overtaking them, but I haven’t experienced any real grumbles.

And I have been on the other side of that too – not long ago, in my pre-buggy days, I was beaten by a buggy in a 10-mile race. I was going as fast as I could but only nearly caught up near the end when the baby threw a toy out and his dad had to circle back to fetch it. It still makes me laugh.

I do hope it is going to encourage my son to be a runner too – I see other parents running with their older kids and would like to think we’ll graduate to that one day, although I do suspect I will miss the buggy days hugely.

I am not just saying it – but he genuinely does seem to enjoy buggy running too – especially if I lean over to tickle him while we are going along.

It’s a killer on the back, but hearing him giggling as he hurtles along is one of the best feelings around.

And I believe buggy running has taught me to be less competitive – another dad recently passed me at a parkrun with two kids in a double buggy and also a dog. Fair play to him…I was happy to let him go!

Although there are limits…At the Barcelona Marathon, I saw a man who seemed to be running round with a buggy – now that is too much…isn’t it?

Things to consider  

  • You have to plan well – not just with snacks and drinks, but also in terms of the route and you have to be prepared to bail out at any time
  • You learn lots about good pavements – some routes need to be avoided!
  • It’s not about the buggy – I don’t have a proper running buggy (even though it’s called Baby Jogger). Some people have three-wheelers but I like my four-wheeler as it’s quite responsive.

Any other buggy runners out there? Please comment with any more tips to pass on too!

A love letter to parkrun

I may only be on my second post, but I could not go any further without a quick love letter to parkrun.

I feel I might be preaching to the converted here, but I am a big fan of parkrun for its inclusivity, atmosphere, positivity…and all the options it offers.

Most Saturday mornings are spent here…

parkrun is flexible and it’s totally personal – you can go whenever you want, wherever you want and take it as seriously as you want.

Once I realised that meeting friends and/or having a cup of tea afterwards was as important as the run, it all clicked.

When I first went along, I never thought I would get to 100, and was delighted when I passed that landmark last year.

With the 250 milestone a long way off now, I have been enjoying finding some other things to aim at for 2017.

These are:

  • 25 volunteering shifts – I don’t quite know why, but I never got round to ordering the 50 or 100 parkrun t-shirts. I thought I would order them as soon as I could, but then I didn’t and now it seems too late. But the 25 purple volunteer t-shirt is one that I definitely do want.
    Volunteering at parkrun is always a pleasure and makes you feel so much more a part of the community. And it’s not just for the injured or those with an event on the Sunday. I am currently on 15 but hope to get to 25 by the end of the year. The future is purple.
  • 100 parkruns at my local run – I am currently on 96 runs for Cardiff Blackweir (@cardiffparkrun) and am looking forward to reaching the century.
    It’s the volunteers who make parkrun possible

    I might even have got there already if I hadn’t forgotten my barcode a couple of times. Or, on a couple of occasions, I had not wanted to record my time in case it messed up my average (this was in the very, very early days when I took it far too seriously).

  • 20 different locations – parkrun tourism is another of the great things about parkrun. I am currently on 15 locations and I love getting to different events to see what their course is like, meeting the organisers and volunteers, and trying a different café.
    There is a little group of four of us who have a whatsapp group where we plan our next adventures to explore, or if I am away somewhere new, I am always working out if I can fit in a parkrun to start the day.
    Barry Island, Conwy, Guildford, Cheltenham, Reigate and Aberystwyth are a few of the ones I have got to so far, and I look forward to getting to lots more in the future.
  • I hesitate to put this on here, but my final secret ambition is to get back under 20 minutes again.
    I really don’t think times are very important any more, but I used to be able to do it…and maybe I could again? It has been a good few years since I had a proper go at this, and I know it’s a tall order and will take quite a bit of training.

    Glorious views across the estuary at the RSPB reserve which hosts the Conwy course

    Admittedly, running with a buggy for probably around 50 or 60 runs has not helped in the speed stakes, so it all depends on how much time I get.

Whether I reach these targets or not, I can’t thank the parkrun teams around the country enough – from everyone at head office to each volunteer who makes this amazing movement possible.

It has to be the most accessible community out there for runners, and it’s there week after week after week…for free.

I am sure to mention parkrun again in this blog soon, and I am looking forward to getting more familiar with junior parkrun once my boy reaches four next year.

Let me know what you think, and any great parkruns I should be aiming to visit!